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GMLive by YellowAfterlife: code and run gml live in your browser

I just discovered GameMaker Community Forums moderator YellowAfterlife’s wonderful in-browser utility, GMLive.

I’d long been wanting YoYoGames to produce a GML console that I could type in a simple snippet of code that I could run to see what it does without the need of having to set up a project, build, and run it, similar to the REPL in Python, so I’m thrilled to learn that this exists. It’s very well done, and while not 100% compatible with GML, it’s very close, and very well documented.

Math every game developer should know

[Editor’s note: For now this is kindof a stub article.

I’m brain dumping a list of math that I use all the time (or would like to) in making video games. 

For now, it’s just a list of areas of math that come in really handy, again and again, with many games. I won’t try to put lessons into this article; this is just a list of topics to check into.

I’d love to grow this list! Leave a comment, or contact me with suggestions for more math to add.

Over time, I’ll probably flesh this out with a list of gamedev-specific uses for each type of math.]

  1. linear algebra

  2. trigonometry

  3. stochastic functions (randomness)

  4. probability

  5. permutation

  6. matrix algebra

  7. fibonacci

  8. statistics

  9. binary and bitwise math

AtariBox update: who is Feargal Mac?

I learned more today about Feargal Mac, real name Mac Conuladh, one of the guys behind the AtariBox. And what I found out wasn’t so good.

It looks like this guy has been involved in a number of dubious crowd funded tech gizmos before. And by dubious, I mean disastrous. This guy’s LinkedIn profile reads like a character from Silicon Valley: a CEO of various incarnations of rapidly pivoting smoke/mirrors vaporware startups that promise a lot while having nothing.

If you look at Mac’s twitter profile, he still lists his website as gameband.com, one of the crowdfunded gadgets he was involved with. Here’s a screen capture that I took of the page today:

gameband.com screencap

Not quite as exciting as zombo.com, but give it time!

Based on this track record, it’s going to take a LOT of evidence and convincing to get me interested in the AtariBox. Maybe it’ll be different this time, after all people do fail, try again, and succeed, and maybe this time they’ll deliver something worth owning, but until I see some substantial evidence of this, I’m no longer interested in the system.

Eleven reasons why It (2017) wasn’t scary for me

  1. No giant spider.
  2. It’s really a demon-thing, but doesn’t even require a +1 weapon to deal damage to it.
  3. It a clown that gets it’s ass handed to It more than once by a small group of loser children.
  4. Whenever It gets hurt by the loser kids, It usually retreats, or else flips out twitching and jerking for a few seconds. It’s kindof a wimp.
  5. It bites Georgie’s arm off. Real scary, right? But there’s almost no pain reaction from him, I guess because he’s in shock? But this recalls the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. “Tis but a scratch! I’ve had worse!” Apart from when Henry Bowers uses his knife on New Kid Ben, I didn’t get any sense of horror from the gore in this film.
  6. Any time It’s around, there’s red balloons. I guess they’re supposed to be threatening and creepy, but they’re really just a giveaway: OK there’s another balloon get ready for It to try to scare us again. Get ready to not be surprised! Literally every single jump scare foreshadowed.
  7. It doesn’t seem to be capable of hurting anyone unless they’re scared. Literally the only thing they have to do is stand up to It, or realize that It’s mind-tricks aren’t real. It’s hard to be scared of something that isn’t real, or is only real in your head.
  8. When big brother Bill encounters It (in the guise of little lost Georgie) in the basement, and It starts repeating “we all float down here” and turning “scary”, I’m thinking “OK he’s just glitching out. Someone needs to file a bug report, and then we can patch it.”
  9. It mostly likes to scare people by turning ugly. Deformed, decaying walking corpses, and that sort of thing. But years of informal sensitivity training has enabled me to empathize with people who have severe appearance deficits, rather than feel repulsed by them. I want to help It feel accepted, as though It too is capable of being loved.
  10. The creepy house at 29 Niebold Street. Hey, it’s not like that place doesn’t scream “haunted”. It obviously put a lot of effort into decor. But did It really have to go with “late 19th century cliche American Victorian?” It’s literally the most obvious place in town It could have picked to make It’s home. Send in the crack team of loser kids!
  11. We have a much worse clown in the White House, and he’s threatening to destroy the world in a nuclear exchange with North Korea. What I wouldn’t give for there to be a supernatural demon that only eats a few children once a generation. Literally every single day in 2017, the news is worse than a statistically abnormal number of missing children.

Overall I enjoyed It, for the acting and the casting, and especially the humorous/lighthearted moments when the kids are just being kids. The children who act in the film look and feel like real children. That much, was great. But I didn’t feel scared. The teaser trailers made it seem like It would be a lot worse than it was.

AtariBox: more prelaunch details emerge

According to VentureBeat, the AtariBox will cost between $250-300, be powered by AMD hardware, and run Linux. Out of the box, it will come packaged with some collection of classic games, playable via emulator, and be capable of playing “midrange” games but not the high-end AAA titles that sell on XBox and PlayStation. No word as yet how the hardware specs compare with Nintendo’s Switch, or really any specs.

According to Atari, AtariBox will be an open system, meaning the end user will be free to customize the Linux environment and install whatever software on it they like, including existing games that run on Linux. This means that games for AtariBox need not be purchased solely through a gated community marketplace, unlike similar app stores offered for Microsoft Xbox, Sony PlayStation, Apple iOS devices, and Windows 10.

As much as I love openness, this seems like a questionable business decision on the part of Atari. Those who remember history will recall that the original Atari 2600 was a huge success when launched in 1977, but eventually 3rd party software developers figured out how to make games for it, culminating in a glut of shovelware which brought the videogame industry to its low point in 1983. Atari was powerless to prevent third parties from flooding the market with crapware, nor were they able to earn revenue from any third party releases.

When Nintendo revived the North American home videogame market in 1985, they did so by launching more powerful hardware than existing previous-gen consoles, and by locking unlicensed third parties out of development with the 10NES chip.

AtariBox will do neither of these things. While the move to lock out the hardware was controversial, and resulted in Nintendo holding monopoly power until the 16-bit era — which they abused — locking out did help Nintendo to establish a level of quality control with the software that could be published for the NES. (Although, to be fair, there were still a lot of terrible NES games — but importantly they did not glut the market and result in a crash that also bankrupted companies that produced high quality games, and the licensing program enabled Nintendo to generate revenue from 3rd party games.)

The ability to play already-released games is nice, but doesn’t seem likely to drive hardware sales. Presumably if you already have games that could be installed on an AtariBox, you also already have some other device already to play them on.

In order for AtariBox to have a hope of being successful, it really needs to have some new, original games, ideally exclusive to its platform, and ideally tied to classic Atari-era properties.

To date, we’ve still seen nothing of this. 2017-style reboots of classic titles like Adventure, SwordQuest, Pitfall, Space Invaders, Crystal Castles, Dig Dug, Pac Man, Frogger, Galaxian, Tempest, and so on, might make the console attractive to old school gamers. But to be honest these old games have already been re-released, sequeled, and rebooted numerous times over the decades since they were originally released, and usually to diminishing returns, failing to capture the magic that made the original game a hit.

Nevertheless, I believe that, if done well, rebooted classics could sell enough to sustain a business. A perfect example of a well done reboot would be the outstanding Pac Man Championship Edition, released some years ago on XBox Live Arcade.

Atari cannot rely on 3rd party developer support to provide AtariBox with exclusive titles, however. There’s zero incentive for studios to produce exclusive content, and sacrifice the entire rest of the market, unless they receive a cut of hardware sales, or are otherwise compensated for the favor they’re doing for the platform. Developers want to release their games everywhere, if possible, and will release games on every platform they can afford to reach. For AtariBox to attract gamers with exclusives, they need to do first-party development.

The console looks nice, but I’ve still yet to see a compelling reason to buy one when it comes out. Atari, heed me: Announce some new games, and make sure they’re good.

We still haven’t seen the controller for the AtariBox, but I’m expecting a modern-looking gamepad rather than the traditional Atari CX40 joystick or paddles. Perhaps these will be options. Certainly the AtariBox would be smart if it had a couple of DB9 ports to accommodate original controllers. As it is, a USB-to-DB9 adapter is perhaps feasible, but not as slick as I’d like for a brand-specific console like this.

(For that matter, it’d be cool if they put a cartridge slot on it, and allowed you to either play your old games on it, or rip them as ROM files to play through emulator. Obviously that’s not a part of the physical product design, but that would have been on my wish list for such a console.)

I would also like to see emulation of games for consoles other than the Atari 2600. The Atari 5200 and 7800 are not as well known, but had some great games, and deserve to be included.

As well, classic Atari coin-op emulation would be a great idea. Real arcade games are a big part of Atari’s legacy, and deserve a showcase. An AtariBox plus authentic controller decks replicating classic arcade controls would sell.

Two things I still want even though it’s 2017

A new Super Mario Bros game set in Subcon, based on the Doki Doki Panic engine
Super Mario Bros 2

Super Mario Bros. 2, the USA release. Everyone knows the story: the Japanese SMB2 was too difficult and unfair, Howard Philips recommended that it not be released stateside, and Nintendo scrambled and put out a game called Yume Kojo: Doki Doki Panic that they re-skinned the player sprites with Mario, Luigi, Toad, and Princess Peach, and had a smash hit. A strong minority of players rank SMB2-US as their favorite entry in the main sequence of Super Mario games, and I am among them.

Perhaps because of its unique development history, there has never been a revisit to the world of Subcon, the dream world setting where SMB2 takes place. And that’s really too bad. I wish I could play a new adventure in this world. The unique mechanics of this game, adding lifting and throwing to the core running and jumping game that made the first game a success just haven’t been used again in a 2D SMB platformer. Nearly 30 years on, this feels like a tragic oversight.

Will we ever?

I’d like to think so, but I don’t think it will be any time soon. Nintendo does have a history of reviving old IP that hasn’t been touched in years. Sequels to Metroid and Kid Icarus didn’t happen for years, despite high popularity of the originals. However, it may be that there are entangling copyright issues preventing the borrowed cast of enemies from Yume Kojo, which was originally created for Fuji TV from making a return on a Nintendo platform again.

A proper NES re-port of the original Metal Gear

Metal Gear MSX title screen

Most US gamers had no way of knowing it, but the original Metal Gear was a mess on the NES. Buggy, poorly translated, and yet somehow still lovable enough to be forgiven, the NES release was perhaps good enough only because there was nothing yet to compare it to.

The true original is the MSX release. The MSX computer wasn’t even available in the USA, as far as I know. I never saw the MSX advertised for sale here, in any case. And even if it was, as an eleven year old kid, I wouldn’t have been able to buy one.

I’ve always wanted to play the original original, but it’s cost prohibitive for me to buy a rare-ish classic computer and one expensive, collectible game just for that one purpose.

Metal Gear spawned one of the great franchises of the video game industry, and clearly deserves a better port to the hardware that introduced it to the US audience. I would love to see a proper port of the original MSX game developed for the NES, even today.

Will we ever?

Unless a fan takes on the project, I highly doubt it would ever be produced as a NES cartridge. But that’s not actually completely out of the question. Fans have been producing ROMhacks and homebrew NES games for years. It would be difficult. A ROMhack of the NES Metal Gear might be the easiest approach to take, but debugging the game, re-translating it, and adding back all the missing content would require a high degree of technical knowledge and skill. It might be better to start over and re-port the MSX Metal Gear as a new project, but that would be even more difficult. But it’s not outside the realm of possibility that a highly motivated, dedicated group of fans could pull it off.

But it’s unthinkable that we’d ever see an official release from Konami, certainly not on a dead console.

Slightly more likely, Konami might release an emulated MSX version with a US translation. However, Konami and Metal Gear creator Hideo Kojima parted on very bad terms after years of public feuding, making it unlikely that the parent company would ever honor the original release in such a fashion.

Game Programming for Artists

Game Programming for Artists by Jarryd Huntley and Hanna Brady

Game Programming For Artists is a new book about to drop by my Cleveland Game Developer colleagues Jarryd Huntley and Hanna Brady.

It’s a book that intends to introduce artists to computer programming for games. Oftentimes artists and programmers come to the problems of game development from a very different set of skills, and it can be a challenge for them to understand each other. As well, often artists have ideas for games that they need help to program, and this book should help them to start to become a little more self sufficient.

I haven’t seen it yet, but I know that they’ve been working hard on it for the past year plus. I’m looking forward to seeing it in print.

Top Atari 2600 games still worth playing

I don’t like to do Top N lists, because it’s always arbitrary.  For whatever value of N you select, there’s always a game that doesn’t make the list that’s just as good as some of the others that did.  Why limit yourself?

Released in 1977, the Atari VCS turned 40 this year.  So there’s no better time to look back at the games that are still worth playing today. The VCS catalog is vast, and there were so many bad games released on it, particularly in ’82-’83, but despite its primitive, minimal hardware specs, there were many outstanding games released on the platform over its life.

These aren’t in any particular order.  I considered ranking them in terms of greatness, alphabetically, and in order of release, or grouping them by categories such as arcade ports, shooters, etc. but there’s no one way to do that.  It’s also hard to separate games that were historically significant, or first innovators, or important evolutionary steps, or have high nostalgia value, from games that are worth playing today purely for their own merits.  I guess there’s a little bit of all of that wrapped up in these recommendations.

I took a look at Wikipedia’s List of Atari 2600 Games and skimmed through it, and picked the games that in my opinion are good plays, and on that first pass, I came up with over 50 titles.  But don’t take this to be “The Top 50 Atari VCS Games”.  I’ve decided to list them alphabetically, because it’s the laziest way to do it.

This list excludes homebrews, which I really shouldn’t because some of the best games ever produced for the VCS are homebrews. But they weren’t on the wikipedia page, and this is already taking too long. But seriously, check out the homebrew scene. Some of the games that have been published in the last few years will blow away the games that we had in 1977-83.

There’s surely a few titles that didn’t make this cut that are still good plays — either games I am not familiar with, or games that I underrated.

I’m not going to try to do justice to reviewing these games in full in this article. And I think a brief description isn’t of much value, either — just go play them. But what I will do is state why I think they’re worth playing.

  1. Adventure: Adventure (1980) (Atari)The “first” (famous) easter egg. My vote for best original game on the system. I spent endless hours investigating and experimenting with the various objects in the game. See my article on Adventure for more details.
  2. Asteroids: Asteroids (1981) (Atari)An arcade classic, free flight screen-wrapping shooter with acceleration and inertia. Blast big space rocks into littler space rocks, while watching out for unfriendly UFOs. A solid arcade port of a classic, great game, with 66 variations.
  3. Astroblast: Astroblast (1982) (M Network)Basically a mashup of Asteroids and Space Invaders; a vertical shooter where you blast space rocks falling towards you from above. In Asteroids, space wraps toroidally around the edges of the screen; rocks that drift off the edge appear on the other side. In Astroblast, you lose points for rocks you fail to shoot, which can result in a negative score. In a weird way, you can think of this as analogous to the spatial wrapping in Asteroids; in Astroblast space doesn’t wrap — the score does.
  4. Berzerk: Berzerk (1982) (Atari)A fantastic, faithful port of the arcade game. Run around an endless maze, fighting mindless robots programmed to kill you, and fleeing from the invincible Evil Otto.  The only thing missing is the digitized speech.  (And there’s a homebrew for that!)
  5. Boxing: Boxing (1980) (Activision)A basic, competent sports simulation which shines in 2P. More so than most consoles, the Atari 2600 offered a lot of very good 2-player vs. games, which made it a more social console than the NES, which tended to feature long-form 1P action-adventure games.
  6. California Games: California Games (1988) (Epyx) California Games (1988) (Epyx) California Games (1988) (Epyx)Featuring a  chiptune cover of “Louie, Louie”, that and the surfing event are more than enough to make this worth playing.  But the hackey sack mini game is pretty good too. The other events include half-pipe skateboarding, and a BMX downhill run.
  7. Combat: Combat (1977) (Atari)Going all the way back to the beginning. The original pack-in title, and a very worthy 2P vs. game. Battle a friend for a two minute round with a variety of dueling tanks, bi-planes, and jets.
  8. Crystal Castles: Crystal Castles (1984) (Atari)One of the more interesting games influenced by the dot-munching Pac-Man, you control a bear as he gathers gems in a 2.5D map while avoiding a variety of whimsical baddies such as skulls, a witch, a swarm of bees, animated trees, and giant gem-eating caterpillars. The 3D-looking levels are particularly well done, considering the hardware capabilities. Elevators and tunnels are present which give the game a true 3D feel. A fantastic port of the arcade classic.
  9. Dig Dug: Dig Dug (1983) (Atari)Dig Dug was another popular game influenced by Pac-Man, but was one of he more original designs to take direct influence from the popular maze game.  In Dig Dug, the “maze” is created by the player as they dig through the dirt. Instead of energizer pills, Dig Dug is armed with an air pump that he can use to defend himself against monsters, or he can undermine a rock which can fall, crushing his enemies.
  10. Frogger: Frogger (1982) (Parker Bros)Yet another great arcade port. Hop your frog across a road and river, avoiding cars, snakes, alligators, and drowning, because for some reason frogs aren’t able to swim in this game.
  11. Frostbite: Frostbite (1983) (Activision)Similar to the more well known Q*Bert, in that you hop around on things, changing their color. In Frostbite, you jump on ice flows to collect material to build an igloo. The mechanics are quite different from Q*Bert, howeverIn a way, it reminds me of another Activision game, SeaQuest.  If SeaQuest and Frogger had a baby, it might be Frostbite.
  12. Galaxian: Galaxian (1983) (Atari)Another arcade port, what it lacks in graphics it more than makes up for with gameplay. Galaxian was a spiritual successor to Space Invaders, and followed its vertical shooter, no scrolling, waves of enemies in rows and columns formula, but added dive bombing (and, in the arcade, full color graphics). I enjoy this version of Galaxian more than the arcade, by a wide margin. Full review.
  13. Gravitar: Gravitar (1983) (Atari)A free-flight shooter similar to Asteroids, but with more complex game play involving destroying bunkers on planets. The planetary gravity adds a dimension of difficulty to the game. Watch your fuel, and take care with your inertia. It’s really challenging.
  14. Gyruss: Gyruss (1984) (Parker Bros)Another arcade port, Gyruss is a twist on the Space Invaders formula that has you shooting into a faux-3D field where sprites shrink and disappear into the distance, a bit like Tempest but without the wireframe tunnels. Like Galaga, enemy ships fly into the screen from the side/behind the player, doing acrobatics before taking up formation in the center of the screen. And like Galaga, there’s a double-shot power-up. The arcade game had an awesome soundtrack, based on Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D Minor. The VCS can’t quite replicate this, but it does have a (for the technology, decent) musical soundtrack, one of the few Atari VCS games to do so. Graphically it also lags behind the arcade original, but that’s to be expected — it’s an Atari 2600.
  15. H.E.R.O.: H.E.R.O. (1984) (Activision)Fly through caves wearing a helicopter backpack, blasting through walls and killing cave denizens with a laser in order to clear a path to rescue people who didn’t have enough sense to stay out of caves.
  16. Haunted House: Haunted House (1982) (Atari)I never played this game as a kid, because I never knew anyone who had it. But even if I did, I probably would have been too scared to play it. I’ve tried to play it recently, and couldn’t figure it out. This is one of those games where you have to read the manual in order to understand the cryptic messages the graphics and sounds are trying to convey.
  17. Joust: Joust (1983) (Atari)The original “flappy bird” game! One of the best two player games of the early arcade era, and a fantastic arcade port. Jockeys mounted on flying ostriches compete in an arena by “jousting”.  The higher lance wins the contest – the loser is a rotten egg. The 2P mode is a cooperative affair, or you can compete against each other by PVP kills.
  18. Keystone Kapers: Keystone Kapers (1983) (Activision)A proto-platformer by Activision. You play as a keystone kop, chasing a burglar through a multi-story department store full of obstacles. Jump and duck and gradually gain on the thief, hopefully catching him before he escapes.
  19. Kool-Aid Man: Kool-Aid Man (1983) (M Network)Originally, to get a copy of this game, you had to drink a huge amount of kool-aid, and send in proofs of purchases. I think it must have been available in stores as well, because this game is not as rare as it would have been otherwise. It’s a decent game to play. You play as a pitcher of kool-aid, who is guarding a swimming pool full of water which is under assault by swarms of “Thirsties” who slowly drink it up. If you collide with a “Thirsty” who isn’t drinking, it will bounce you around the screen out of control. But if you collide with a “Thirsty” that is in the act of drinking, you eliminate it, getting points and protecting that water. You can gain a few seconds of invulnerability by grabbing symbols of the ingredients for kool-aid (icons representing Water, Kool-Aid mix, and Sugar). When the swimming pool runs out of water, the game is over.  Seriously, it’s better than it sounds.
  20. Mario Bros.: Mario Bros. (1983) (Atari)A very well done arcade port. After Donkey Kong, Mario made a career shift from carpentry to plumbing, and started battling sewer turtles and collecting coins. The direct sequel to this game, Super Mario Bros. would set the industry on fire and change the world forever.
  21. Megamania: MegaMania (1982) (Activision)One of the most finely tuned shooters on the system. I’ve written extensively about it already.
  22. Missile Command: Missile Command (1981) (Atari)Near perfect arcade port. Although the arcade game featured track ball controls, this version of Missile Command plays every well with a joystick.
  23. Montezuma’s Revenge: Montezuma's Revenge (1984) (Parker Bros)A brutally unforgiving platformer with greater dimensionality than Pitfall, but not as well remembered today.
  24. Mountain King: Mountain King (1983) (CBS Electronics)An exploration quest platformer with interesting audio mechanics, not to mention what’s probably the best use of music in a game of its era. Gather diamonds, find the Flame Spirit, offer it to the Skull Spirit who guards the temple, steal the crown, and escape to the top of the mountain to become the Mountain King. Beware the terrifying giant spider in the basement. There is a glitch world hidden in the upper reaches of the sky, accessible by an impossible leap.
  25. Ms. Pac Man: Ms. Pac-Man (1982) (Atari)A far better port than Pac Man was. Homebrewers have been working on worthy Pac Man ports for the VCS for years, with extremely impressive results, but in 1982 this was as good as it got (unless you had an Atar 5200).
  26. Pete Rose Baseball: Pete Rose Baseball (1988) (Absolute)Another game to come very late in the life of the console, Pete Rose Baseball is easily the most graphically impressive baseball game on the VCS. However, looks aren’t everything. RealSports Baseball actually plays better, with better fielding and baserunning controls. But this is still worth playing just to see that it was possible to make a game on the Atari that looked like this.
  27. Phoenix: Phoenix (1982) (Atari)One of the better successors to Space Invaders, featuring one of the earliest boss battles. The other innovation present here is shields, which make you immobile but invulnerable for a few seconds. Very handy for when you were trapped in a corner by a divebombing bird, or under heavy fire from the mothership.
  28. Pitfall:Pitfall! (1982) (Activision)A run and jump action game, and a proto-platformer, Pitfall was remarkable for its time. Exploring the procedurally generated screens of a pixellated jungle in search of treasure such as bags of money, diamonds, and silver and gold ingots. A lot of the fun of this game was in seeing how far you could go, but also in discovering through repeated play that the screens in the game weren’t random, and that as you played more and more, you could map your way through the game, taking shortcuts through the underground tunnels.
  29. Pitfall II: Lost Caverns: Pitfall II (1983) (Activision)The sequel to Pitfall!, this game went beyond the side-scrolling adventure, and introduced a huge, cavernous world with vertical scrolling sections as well as horizontal. The game featured swimming and balloon-assisted flight, and new hazards such as condors, poisonous frogs, and bats. It had a musical soundtrack, and if that wasn’t advanced enough for the Atari 2600, the music was dynamically linked to the in-game action, turning sad when you got hurt, and jubilant when you grabbed a treasure. It was also one of the first video games to feature save points and instead of having “lives”, when Pitfall Harry “died” he returned to the last save point he touched, loosing points for his trouble.  Full Review.
  30. Pressure Cooker:Pressure Cooker (1983) (Activision)You’re a short order cook building hamburgers by catching ingredients flying out of boxes on the right side and adding them to burgers on the assembly line. Get the order right and drop it into the bin. Memory, concentration, and quick thinking are needed to succeed.
  31. Private Eye: Private Eye (1983) (Activision)I never played this title back in the day, but discovered it recently, decades later. It’s confusing to play, reading the manual is necessary in order to understand what’s going on, but you’re a private eye driving around a city in a car trying to solve a crime by finding clues.  The mechanics of the game are weird, you can jump your car, which is a convertible, and when your car jumps, you jump much higher, and fall back down into the car. This is required to dodge obstacles and enemies and to collect clues and other items. Figuring out how to navigate the map and understand the clues in the manual are the keys to fun in this game.
  32. Q*Bert: Q-bert (1987) (Atari)A remarkably good port of the arcade action-puzzle game. Hop on blocks arranged in a pyramid shape to change their color to the correct color to complete the level and advance, while dodging an assortment of weird enemies. To play this game correctly, you need to hold the joystick at an angle, so that the fire button is at 12 o’clock, and you’re essentially using the diagonals as up/down/left/right.
  33. Radar Lock: Radar Lock (1989) (Atari)Released late in the life of the console, in 1989, this sophisticated jet fighter simulation game takes you from the runway takeoff, to dogfighting, and even features mid-air refueling. Multiple weapons systems are activated with the 2P controller. The graphics are pretty good considering the hardware. Compared to Top Gun on the NES, or Sega’s Afterburner, this game isn’t all that impressive, but on the Atari 2600 it more than holds its own.
  34. RealSports Baseball: RealSports Baseball (1982) (Atari)An impressive simulation of the game of baseball, the first baseball game on the Atari that was a full implementation of baseball’s rules, rather than an impressionistic “interpretation” of a “baseball-like” game.  Even the infield fly rule is implemented. You can only fully appreciate this game with two players; the CPU controlled opponent in a 1-player game is nearly unbeatable.
  35. Riddle of the Sphinx: Riddle of the Sphinx (1982) (Imagic)An early questing puzzle game that demands you read the manual, loosely based on ancient Egyptian mythology.  To pass various points in the vertically scrolling world, you must find and offer the correct treasure at one of the various temples. Clues found in the instruction booklet make this a bit easier to do.  Along the way, you must fend off marauding thieves and scorpions and thirst. There were numerous items to be found, through trading with merchants or by digging in the desert sand, and these gave you various abilities.
  36. River Raid: River Raid (1982) (Activision)One of the best scrolling shooters of its day.  Continuously scrolling, procedurally-generated stages.
  37. SeaQuest: Seaquest (1983) (Activision)A great action game from Activision. You control a submarine, trying to rescue divers who are being chased by sharks you can destroy with torpedoes. Fill up your sub with 6 divers and return to the surface before you run out of oxygen. It’s very simple, but a lot of fun as the speed increases with each time you return to the surface.
  38. Secret Quest:Secret Quest (1989) (Atari)Another late title for the system, this one was designed by Nolan Bushnell himself. I never knew about this game when it was released because by the time it came out the NES was ruling the world.  Walk around a space station infested with aliens, looking for a self destruct mechanism. Your main armament is a Energy Sword, but there are other weapons as well. I’ve only played this one a little bit, but it’s clear this is a sophisticated quest game for the Atari.
  39. Solar Fox: Solar Fox (1983) (CBS Electronics)Another great arcade port. Solar Fox is like Pac Man, in that you have to pick up dots (“solar cells”) on the screen in order to advance to the next screen. But there’s no maze. You just fly around on an invisible grid, at slow or fast speed, avoiding stuff that shoots at you from the edges of the screen. And you can’t shoot back, only dodge. The challenge is to collect all the cells in the shortest amount of time possible, and there are optimal flight paths to take in order to have the best chance at doing that.
  40. Solaris:Solaris (1986) (Atari)A first person space shooter published late in the life of the console, at a point when the obsolete Atari VCS was competing against the NES. There were a lot of similar games for the Atari, but this was perhaps the best of them, with more variety and better graphics. Check out Star Raiders, Star Voyager, and Star Master if you’re a fan of the genre.
  41. Space Invaders: Space Invaders (1980) (Atari)A fantastic arcade port with over 100 variations. Clear wave after wave of invading aliens who march across the sky in lock-step formation, speeding up as their numbers dwindle.  Hit their mothership for bonus points.
  42. Spider Fighter: Spider Fighter (1982) (Activision)Extremely fast-paced shooter with extremely smooth motion that will make you twitch.
  43. Star Master:Another cockpit shooter, like Star Raiders and Star Voyager. Which one is my favorite? Which one is which?
  44. Star Raiders:Star Raiders (1982) (Atari) One of several first-person cockpit shooters, it came out the same year as Star Master, and is very similar.
  45. Star Trek: Strategic Operations Simulator:Star Trek - Strategic Operations Simulator (1983) (Sega)An unusual multi-view shooter with a 3D first person view combined with a top down view. The graphics are fantastic, with recognizable depictions of the USS Enterprise and Klingon Bird of Prey spacecraft, and even music from the TV show is represented.  Warp from sector to sector, fighting Klingons and protecting Federation bases. This is an outstanding shooter with depth.
  46. Star Voyager: Star Voyager (1982) (Imagic)A cockpit simulator 3D space shooter. This was about as real as it got in 1982.  See Star Raiders, Solaris, and Star Master for more of the same.
  47. Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back:Star Wars - The Empire Strikes Back (1982) (Parker Bros)A very well done scrolling shooter, re-creating the battle on the ice planet of Hoth. You pilot Luke Skywalker’s snow speeder, and try to give the Rebels enough time to escape by battling Imperial AT-AT walkers. It’s a repetitive game that has an inevitable doom at the end, but the controls and sound effects are excellent, making this a worthy shooter if you like games like Defender and Stargate, definitely a must play if you’re a Star Wars fan.
  48. Stargate: Stargate (1984) (Atari)An especially faithful port of the arcade sequel to Defender, it’s one of the best rendered arcade ports on the Atari. Uses dual joystick controls, one for flight and shooting, the other for the special weapons.
  49. Superman: I’ve written extensively on Superman elsewhere, and this remains one of my favorite games on the system, and of all time.
  50. Surround: Surround (1977) (Atari)Another solid 2P vs. game with numerous variations. It’s basically a “snakes” game, where you control a pixel that draws a path that both players must avoid. Think the light cycle scene in Disney’s classic, Tron. Surround offers a number of variations to keep the action fresh.
  51. Tac-Scan: Tac-Scan (1982) (Sega)In most space shooters, you get to control one ship at a time, and a couple of reserve ships that represent your extra lives.  In Tac-Scan, you control a formation of up to 5 ships, essentially putting all of your lives in play at once. This is an arcade port, and a pretty good one, although it’s a bit simplified with fewer types of enemies.
  52. Threshold: Threshold (1982) (Tigervision)A vertical shooter often compared with Megamania as the best of the genre on the console. The enemy motion in this game is especially frustrating. Enemies will dance just out of reach of your bullets, and then kill you after embarrassing you and frustrating you with your futile attempts to connect a shot with them. Whoever programmed it is a real bastard.
  53. Warlords: Warlords (1981) (Atari)The evolutionary zenith of the pong/breakout type games.  Defend your crown by bouncing a ball away from your castle walls and into your enemy’s. Four player is the best way to play.
  54. Word Zapper: Word Zapper (1982) (U.S. Games)One of the more novel game concepts, based on spelling.  Shoot letters in a scrolling marquee to spell a word. Reflexes, spelling, and memorization are all important, particularly on the difficult random letter sequence levels. It’s more fun and more challenging than it sounds.
  55. Yar’s Revenge: Yars' Revenge (1982) (Atari)A remix of the basic concepts of Star Castle, and somewhat overrated in my opinion, but still a solid, innovative game, with outstanding audio and good graphics.

 

Adobe Flash EOL in 2020 – how will we preserve games?

Adobe announced today that it would cease development and support of Flash in 2020.

Of course, there were (and are) a lot of issues with Flash:

  • the proprietary nature of the Flash Player plugin;
  • memory and CPU usage;
  • stability problems;
  • security problems;
  • privacy concerns over Flash cookies;
  • Flash advertising/malware;
  • lack of accessibility in many Flash objects, resulting in issues for people with disabilities, screen readers, search engine indexing spiders, or for anyone who simply didn’t have the Flash Player installed, etc.;
  • and poorly programmed Flash objects.

So it’s not entirely a bad thing that Flash’s time is nearly at an end.

While this news doesn’t exactly come as a surprise to those who have been following the life of Flash since the iPhone launched, it does raise a serious question:

What will happen to all the games created in Flash when Flash is dropped from mainstream web browser support?

How will the history of games developed in Flash be preserved?

This is no small question. Over the 20+ years that Flash has been around, thousands of games have been built with it. Many of them are good games that still hold replay value. But without a viable platform with which to play them, will they wink out of existence and be forgotten?

I think the best approach to preserving Flash’s historical legacy would be to create a version of the Flash Player in Javascript or Web Assembly, and then any web site can use that to backfill support for any Flash objects that they wish to serve.

What are your favorite Flash games?

Mega Maker

Mega Maker

Mega Maker is to Mega Man what Mario Maker is to Mario. Except, it’s not an officially licensed Capcom product, and it’s free. Built by fans using GameMaker, it’s probably the best thing I’ve ever seen built out of GameMaker.

It’s awesome.

It’s very easy to use, and a lot of fun. Not that you really need it, but there’s a tutorial that explains everything in the editor with great style. Actually, the tutorial is very well done and I recommend using it to understand some of the finer points. But most of the point and click interface is intuitive to anyone who’s used a mouse-driven interface and knows a thing or two about Mega Man.

Mega Maker

I had my first level built and running in about ten minutes.

Unfortunately it only includes a small sample of the Mega Man resources from the first six games on the NES, but even so there’s a lot that you can do with the designer. There doesn’t seem to be any provision for designing your own enemies, bosses, or adding your own sprites or music. On the other hand, there’s zero coding needed, and it’s easy enough to use that an average grade schooler could get up and running designing levels in no time.

There’s an online community for uploading your level designs and downloading and playing the designs of other players.

So much work has gone into this, and it holds so much promise. I hope that Capcom sees fit to muzzle their legal team. If you’ve ever enjoyed a classic MM game, you really need to download this and give it a try.

csanyk.com © 2016
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